= Strasbourg-ESO Catalogue of Galactic Planetary Nebulae =
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Update 7/15/2005: The SEC database, version 7, compiled by Kent Wallace, is available from this link. There are other files available too.


+ INFORMATION ON S.E.C. DATA TABLES +

Note to observers: There are 4 columns in these data tables that indicate positive or negative observations (sightings) by Steve Gottlieb, Jack Marling, Kent Wallace, and 'Other' (OO)!.  It would be most beneficial if YOU could provide additional information on any of these 1143 planetaries, and to help fill in the blanks or update any positive OR negative observation notation in the table. Any input would be gratefully appreciated, and credit for your observations will be noted in the data table.

Data Table Links By Right Ascension (23 Tables)
00 00 > 04 25.8 04 36.6 > 06 54.5 06 55.2 > 08 20.7 08 20.9 > 10 05.8 10 06.9 > 12 08.4 12 09.0 > 14 18.4
14 20.8 > 16 01.0 16 01.3 > 16 48.0 16 48.6 > 17 18.9 17 19.2 > 17 29.7 17 29.7 > 17 39.9 17 40.1 > 17 50.3
17 50.4 > 17 57.1 17 57.3 > 18 04.9 18 05.0 > 18 13.3 18 13.7 > 18 27.8 18 27.9 > 18 43.6 18 44.0 > 19 01.0
19 01.4 > 19 19.0 19 19.2 > 19 46.6 19 48.4 > 20 29.3 20 31.6 > 22 31.7 22 32.3 > 24 00.0

Clear Skies!

 

A directory of the 23 tables, tabulated by Right Ascension, is also available at the bottom of this page.
Note: All tables being updated starting June 2002. This includes positions, magnitudes, positive/negative sightings, and the correction of numerous typos appearing in the tables.

In the following table, compiled by STEVE GOTTLIEB and KENT WALLACE,  you will find information on 1143 planetaries in the 1992 Strasbourg-ESO Catalogue of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (SEC) published by the European Southern Observatory as well as observing results from Steve, Jack Marling, Kent, and Maurice Clark (Australia). The following columns of data are included for each object :

(1) The principal designation of the planetary. NGC and IC objects are listed in the format NXXXX and ICXXXX respectively, while other planetaries generally bear their discoverer's last initial and discovery list (e.g. M1-1 refers to the first planetary in the first discovery list published by Minkowski). It should be noted that most planetaries have way more than one designation based on their appearance in several surveys. (NOTE: All designations that are underlined are linked to the applicable Observing Report by Steve Gottlieb, Kent Wallace and several other PN observers; just click on designation and you will be cyber-transported to that report.)

PN's with (unvisited) links should appear in blue (may be black also); visited links should appear in purple. 
Some of the abbreviations include:

Ap = Apriamasvili, Ba = Baade, Bl = Blanco, BV = Bšhm-Vitense, Cn = Cannon, CnMy =Cannon/Mayall, Fg = Fleming, H = Haro, Hb = Hubble, He = Henize, Hf = Hoffleit, Hu = Humason, J = Jonckheere, K = Kohoutek, M = Minkowski, Me = Merrill, My = Mayall, MyCn = Mayall/Cannon, Mz = Menzel, Na = Nassau, PB = Peimbert/B‡tiz, PC = Peimbert/Costero, Pe = Perek, Ps = Pease, Sh = Sharpless, Sn = Shane, Sp = Shapley, SwSt = Swings/Struve, Tc = Thackeray, Th = The, Vd = Vandervort, Ve = Velghe, Vy = Vyssotsky, YM = Johnson.

 

(2) PK number from the Catalogue of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (CGPN) by Perek and Kohoutek. A "*" after a PK # denotes that the object is considered a 'Possible' PN.  An 'M' after a PK # denotes the PN is misclassified and no longer considered a PN

(3) SEC number from the Strasbourg-ESO Catalogue of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (PN G number, based on galactic coordinates). A "*" after a PN G # denotes that the PN has a note in the SECGPN NOTES.

(4) RA for epoch 2000.0 rounded to the nearest tenth of a minute of RA.

(5) Dec for epoch 2000.0 rounded to the nearest minute. Positions have been checked using the Strausberg-ESO Catalogue of Galactic Planetary Nebulae as well as directly using the Hubble Guide Star Catalogue for many planetaries.

(6) Major and minor diameter of the planetary. Generally this figure was obtained from the PK or SEC catalogue. In cases where several diameters were given from different researchers the most recent figure was used. It should be noted that visually the planetary may appear significantly smaller if the outer regions have a very low surface brightness and diameters obtained from blue and red sensitive plates can also vary considerably.

(7) Estimated distance in Light Years / (Type).  This information obtained from current astronomical resources, including Sky Catalog 2000.0, Vol. 2  (Sky Publishing). These values are included for information only, as there are many uncertanties in determining distances beyond 100 ly's. As new data is reviewed, such as values determined from the HIPPARCOS mission, these values will be updated. Any characters enclosed within parentheses indicate the type (classification) of the planetary. A discussion of Types can be found here.

(8) Approximate visual or photographic magnitude of the planetary / (Central Star). Photographic magnitudes from the PK catalogue are followed by a "p" and are very unreliable as to the visual appearance. Do not be discouraged by some apparently very faint listings! All other entries are either computed visual magnitudes based on a formula from Jack Marling or else eyeball estimates. These are more reliable than the photographic magnitudes but likely contain some significant errors due to faulty information in the professional literature or poor visual estimates due to varying seeing and transparency conditions. Values enclosed within parentheses are the estimated or measured values of the central star, where known.

(9) Surface Brightness:
This represents the visual 'energy' of an extended object taking into consideration its size and visual magnitude, and expressing that calculated value as the magnitude per unit of surface area. For the values in these tables, the value is x.xx magnitudes per square arcminute.  Since the values for visual magnitude and size vary considerably in astronomical literature, even for the same object, these numbers again are useful for casual reference only. But they do provide information to help determine how visible an object might be. For example, NGC 7293, the Helix, has a visual mag. of around 8, but since its size is approximately 15 arc minutes, the surface brightness is a very faint 13.6. magnitudes/sq. arc min. On the opposite side, NGC6881 has a visual mag. of 13.6; but its size is 4 arc seconds, so the calculated value of s.b. comes out to be 7.7, easily visible in the telescope. It is generally felt that your eyes should be able to discern typical PNe. color in objects that have a s.b. of 8.0 or less (i.e. 6.0). For objects in the table that are listed as 'stellar' in the Size column, I have arbitrarily assigned a size of 1" x 2" - some of these objects, although listed as stellar, may in fact be several times larger, which would decrease the surface brightness. But the value shown gives a ballpark figure - it probably is lower, but can not be much higher.

(10) Constellation of the Planetary Nebulae

(11) The Uranometria 2000.0 chart number (2nd Ed. - 1st Ed.) in which the planetary most conveniently appears. As this is the most widely used detailed star atlas, many amateurs will likely use this source to track down many planetaries. Some objects, though, will need to be hand plotted on this atlas or more detailed charts used such as MegaStar. Phototographic finder charts from the CGPN or SEC are also very helpful as well as CCD images from John Vickers' Deep Space Atlas.

(12) Visual results, either positive (+) or negative (-), from Steve Gottlieb using 17.5" and 13" Dobsonians and a C-8 from several dark northern California sites. If the C-8 was used, an "8" is attached to the sighting and 13" sightings have a "3" appended to the result.

(13) Visual results, either positive or negative, from Dr. Jack Marling using an 17.5" reflector at Digger Pines, California and 18"-20" scopes at several Texas Star Parties at Prude Ranch. Since the scopes used were similar aperture, no distinction is made in his list.

(14) Visual results from a very active planetary nebulae observer Kent Wallace using an 8" Schmidt-Cassegrain and a 20" Obsession from a dark southern California site. Results with his 20" have a "2" appended to the + or - sighting. Otherwise all results are with his 8" scope.

(15) Found on a few pages - visual results contributed from other observers (OO). Their initials are included in the column, and a link to the page with their report.

Data Table Links By Right Ascension (23 Tables)
00 00 > 04 25.8 04 36.6 > 06 54.5 06 55.2 > 08 20.7 08 20.9 > 10 05.8 10 06.9 > 12 08.4 12 09.0 > 14 18.4
14 20.8 > 16 01.0 16 01.3 > 16 48.0 16 48.6 > 17 18.9 17 19.2 > 17 29.7 17 29.7 > 17 39.9 17 40.1 > 17 50.3
17 50.4 > 17 57.1 17 57.3 > 18 04.9 18 05.0 > 18 13.3 18 13.7 > 18 27.8 18 27.9 > 18 43.6 18 44.0 > 19 01.0
19 01.4 > 19 19.0 19 19.2 > 19 46.6 19 48.4 > 20 29.3 20 31.6 > 22 31.7 22 32.3 > 24 00.0

Clear Skies!

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Douglas Snyder (July 1998)